5/27: NUDHL Reading Group – Between Humanities and the Digital, Part III

BETWEEN HUMANITIES AND THE DIGITAL, PART III

Svennson Goldberg BT Digital Humanities

eds. Patrik Svensson and David Theo Goldberg (MIT Press, 2015)


Friday, 5/27, 10am-noon (Rescheduled from 5/20)

PART III – (pp. 329-506)

*held in Gender and Sexuality Studies Program Conference Room, 1800 Sherman Avenue, 4th floor*


The Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory invites those interested in this emerging field of interdisciplinary scholarship to join us for a three-part reading group.

No previous digital humanities experience required.

Books are available for free at the AKIH to interested faculty, students, and staff. 

Attend one or all discussions as your schedule and interests permit.

Please email NUDHL co-convener Michael Kramer, [email protected], with any questions.

Using Maps to Tell Stories

World.Wine.Web.

Using Maps to Tell Stories:
Ancient Rome in Chicago
Shakespeare’s Circuits

The emergence of new digital tools has enabled students to extend their capabilities beyond the page — into realms of interactive mapping, data visualization, and digital storytelling. But what are these tools, exactly? How and why might we integrate them in our courses? What do students stand to gain?

Next week the MMLC invites faculty members who have recently used web-based mapping tools in the classroom to share their experiences. We’ll hear from Francesca Tataranni (Classics) on how students used Storymap JS to create a virtual walking tour of Ancient Rome in Chicago and Will West (English, Classics) on how how students used the CartoDB platform to map Shakespeare’s Circuits around the globe.

Join us as we continue this conversation, all while enjoying outstanding food and drink.

Friday, May 13, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Ver Steeg Faculty Lounge, Main Library

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DHChicago: New Archival Knowledges

We would be thrilled if you’d circulate this CFP to your department and to any graduate students interested in the digital humanities.
 
All best,
Sarah Kunjummen

PhD Student, Department of English, University of Chicago

*** Attention: please circulate ***

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

DHChicago: New Archival Knowledges
University of Chicago, May 19-20, 2016
Organized by the Macroanalysis & the Humanities Working Group

DHChicago seeks to bring together scholars from across the Chicagoland area and across the disciplines to present work on one of the most promising areas of the digital humanities: macroanalysis, or the computational analysis of textual data and metadata. We are specifically looking for presenters whose work engages with questions, some of which may include:

  • What new knowledges can computational approaches produce about large cultural archives?
  • How can we fold these knowledges back into existing debates within the humanities?
  • How compatible are humanistic questions and computational methods?

The broader goal of DHChicago, building on the work done by organizations such as the Chicago DHCS Colloquium, is to lay groundwork for longer-term intellectual support by fostering inter-institutional and inter-departmental ties, connecting scholars to new resources, and creating new networks of potential interlocutors and collaborators for future endeavors. To this end, the conference seeks presentations that favor a practical, “under the hood” approach. We welcome presentations on ongoing as well as finished projects, and we encourage presenters to talk about the process of building their projects from the bottom up. What problem does the project address? Why did you choose a certain method to engage this problem? How did you arrive at a particular visual representation of your research?

Daniel Shore will deliver a keynote address on Thursday afternoon, entitled “In Defense of Search,” from his forthcoming monograph, Cyberformalism (Johns Hopkins UP, 2017). The conference will take place on Friday. Shore will also be leading a workshop that day on the syntactical analysis of regular expressions. Please email us to sign up to attend the workshop.

Proposals are due by Friday, May 6, 2016 and should include: a title, abstract of up to 250 words, and, in the email, the author’s name, a C.V., institutional affiliation, and email address. For more information, please contact Sarah Kunjummen and Jonathan Schroeder at [email protected] or visit our website.

Digital History Opportunity: Evanston Historical Society

Northwestern University
 Nicholas D. Chabraja Center for Historical Studies
http://www.historicalstudies.northwestern.edu/
invites you to apply for a summer fellowship! 

The CCHS is co-sponsoring a summer 2016 fellowship at the Evanston History Center (previously the Evanston Historical Society) http://evanstonhistorycenter.org/ for 4-7 weeks in the summer (June/July/August all possible).

Sam Kling started on this project last summer and can tell you more about it. Here’s his description:

This job entails processing and cataloging digital files of Evanston newspapers, then uploading them to database software to make them accessible to the public online. It will be a self-directed project, so an ability to work independently is essential. It will require use of database software such as Omeka. If you have experience with Omeka or similar software, great. If not, this will be your self-directed opportunity to learn. You’ll need to take advantage of digital humanities resources at Northwestern, build relationships with library staff, and coordinate with the Evanston History Center. At the end of this process, you will have managed and carried out an important public history/digital humanities project–an impressive accomplishment and an attractive item on a CV!

The Center will pay a stipend of up to $3,000, either as a summer fellowship ($1000 per month for June-August) or as taxable Special Pay ($30 per hour). Please send your application to Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch at[email protected] by Monday, MAY 9.

Application materials should include the ff.:

  1. Current CV with contact information
  2. One-page explanation why you are the right historian for this project.
  3. A one-sentence e-mail approval from your dissertation advisor.

Researcher’s Toolkit – Visualization and GIS

Remember to register! As always, pizza will be provided.
 

Interactive Visualization on the Web with D3.js – May 3

Instructor: Alessandro Febretti, Sr. Interactive Visualization Specialist, Research Computing Services, Northwestern Information Technology

Web-based visualization is gaining popularity thanks to its wide availability and ease of use. In this toolkit you will discover the basics of D3.js, a Javascript library that helps create powerful visualizations on the web. D3 lets you combine data from multiple sources and gives you full control on the final look of your data. We will go through the steps needed to set up a basic development environment, create a simple visualization and make it accessible to other people online. All you need to follow along are your laptop with your favorite browser and text editor installed.

When: Tuesday, May 3
Time: Noon – 1:00 p.m.
Location: The Garage – Workspace See map.

Register to attend.

Advanced Interactive Visualization on the Web with D3.js – May 17

Instructor: Alessandro Febretti, Sr. Interactive Visualization Specialist, Research Computing Services, Northwestern Information Technology

In this toolkit we will use D3.js to create complex web-based visualizations such as force-directed graphs and heat maps. You will learn how to aggregate and sort data in the browser, how to filter data in real-time, and how to create web pages with multiple coordinated views of your data.

Prerequisite: This toolkit assumes you attended or are already familiar with the topics presented in the May 3 toolkit: Interactive Visualization on the Web with D3.js

When: Tuesday, May 17
Time: Noon – 1:00 p.m.
Location: The Garage – Workspace See map.

Register to attend.

Network Analysis Using ArcGIS Desktop – May 31

Instructor: Kelsey Rydland, GIS and Data Analyst, Northwestern University Libraries

Interested in doing spatial analysis without having the burden of learning a new software package? Want some simple ways of answering common spatial problems? ArcGIS Online is an application that runs on both Windows and MacOS and can be used to quickly and easily help you do things like find locations, create hot spots, drive-time areas or other types network analysis. This presentation provides an overview of the spatial analysis capabilities within ArcGIS Online. No previous experience necessary.

Requirement: Please bring your laptop.

When: Tuesday, May 31
Time: Noon – 1:00 p.m.
Location: The Garage – Workspace See map.

Register to attend.

4/29/16: Whitney Trettien, Harmonizing Difference in the Digital Archive

Harmonizing Difference in the Digital Archive

Dr. Whitney Trettien

Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Trettien Little Gidding 3Trettien Little Gidding 4Trettien Little Gidding 5

Friday, 29 April 2016, noon – 2 pm.

Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, 1800 Sherman Avenue

Lunch provided. Please RSVP to NUDHL co-convener Michael Kramer, [email protected]

All welcome regardless of digital humanities experience.

DESCRIPTION

In 1625, Nicholas Ferrar and his mother Mary left London to found the Anglican community of Little Gidding. There, in an early modern “makerspace” known as the Concordance Room, the women of the community hacked religious books: they chopped apart printed Bibles and engravings with scissors, then pasted these paper fragments back together into elaborate collages of text and image that remix, or “harmonize,” the four Gospels. Together, these thirteen cut-and-paste volumes—comprising perhaps the largest early modern archive of English women’s bookwork—are known as the Little Gidding Harmonies, and they are the subject of Trettien’s digital monograph, “Cut/Copy/Paste: Echoes of Little Gidding.”

Patriarchal assumptions and print-mediated research practices have long obscured the women of Little Gidding’s cross-disciplinary, transatlantic contributions to history. Cutting through these obfuscations, “Cut/Copy/Paste” reconstitutes the community’s scattered fragments through the creation of a digital Concordance Room. There, readers may “harmonize” high-resolution facsimiles of these rare books with a wealth of archival materials. In this talk, Trettien connects this project’s design to broader methodological interventions in the fields of book history, media archaeology, and digital humanities. As objects like the Harmonies underscore, books do not clearly represent the time of their creation but come to us accreted with precarious, uneven evidence of many moments and multiple hands. Attending to these discontinuities in digital spaces requires what Karen Barad, following Donna Haraway, has described as a diffractive approach. Rather than smoothing over striations of difference, diffractive digital design illuminates and constellates a diversity of moments, objects, and ideas—much as the women of Little Gidding do in their kaleidoscopic Harmonies.

For more, see “FAQs on the Little Gidding Harmonies.”

BIO

Whitney Trettien (http://whitneyannetrettien.com) is assistant professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she teaches book history, digital humanities, and Renaissance literature. She is co-editor of Provoke! Digital Sound Studies (http://soundboxproject.com), a digital collection of sonic scholarship, and co-editor of thresholds (http://openthresholds.org), a new digital journal and platform for creative/critical scholarship.

4/22: NUDHL Reading Group Part II

DIGITAL HUMANITIES READING GROUP

<<All welcome. No DH expertise or experience required. Attend one or all gatherings.>>

BETWEEN HUMANITIES AND THE DIGITAL

Svennson Goldberg BT Digital Humanities

eds. Patrik Svensson and David Theo Goldberg

(MIT Press, 2015)

The Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory invites those interested in this emerging field of interdisciplinary scholarship to join us for a three-part reading group. No previous digital humanities experience required. Books are available for free at the AKIH to interested faculty, students, and staff. Attend one or all discussions as your schedule and interests permit.

Friday, 4/22, 10 am—noon: Part II (pp. 173-328)

(with particular focus on Whitney Anne Trettien’s essay, “Circuit-Bending History” as she joins us next Friday, 4/29, noon-2 pm.)

Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, 1800 Sherman Ave. 1st Floor Seminar Room

Light refreshments, coffee, tea will be served.

Please email NUDHL co-convener Michael Kramer, [email protected], with any questions.

Final reading group meeting: Friday, 5/27, 10 am—noon: Part III (pp. 329-506), held in the Gender and Sexuality Studies Conference Room, 1800 Sherman Avenue

5/16: TeachX From NUIT Faculty Support Services

TEACHx

Faculty Support Services is proud to present TEACHx, a free one-day event for instructors on Monday, May 16. It’s on the second floor of Norris, and we would love to see you there.

With our partners in the Office of the Provost and the Searle Center for Advancing Learning & Teaching, we have designed a day of short talks and digital poster presentations to highlight instructors leading innovations and experiments in teaching and learning with technology.

The schedule of presenters includes faculty enhancing their pedagogy with blended learning, social media, online learning, peer assessments, learning analytics, mobile application development, MOOCs, and active learning spaces.

Our hope is that this event will spark innovation in teaching, highlight opportunities for further collaboration between instructors and educational technology specialists, and support the creativity of a growing educational technology community of practice.

Learn more and register at teachx.northwestern.edu.

CFP: Exploring the “Humanity” in the Digital Humanities: Africana/Black Studies’ Perspectives on the Digital Humanities

Call for Papers

The 30th Annual Symposium on African American Culture & Philosophy

Exploring the “Humanity” in the Digital Humanities: Africana/Black Studies’ Perspectives on the Digital Humanities

Keynote Speaker: Abdul Alkalimat, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign
Plenary Speakers: Marisa Parham, UMass-Amherst & Kenton Rambsy, University of Texas-Arlington

African American Studies and Research Center Purdue University
West Lafayette, Indiana
December 1-3, 2016

The African American Studies and Research Center invites scholars, practitioners, and graduate students to submit proposals for papers, panels and digital presentations for “Exploring the “Humanity” in the Digital Humanities: Africana/Black Studies’ Perspectives on the Digital Humanities,” its 30th Annual Symposium on African American Culture & Philosophy to consider the relationship between the digital humanities and Africana/Black epistemological frameworks that ask, “What Does It Mean to Be Human?”

Work that is closely associated with the theme will be given preference during the review process. We seek papers and panels from across the disciplines on such sample topics as:

  •   Africana/Black Studies & Digital Recovery
  •   Africana/Black Digital Genealogies
  •   Africana/Black Studies & Spatial Humanities
  •   Africana/Black Studies & the Digital Arts
  •   Data Visualization in Africana/Black Studies
  •   Text & Data Mining in Africana/Black Studies
  •   Africana/Black Studies & Digital Scholarly Communication
  •   Africana/Black Studies & Digital Humanities Pedagogy
  •   Creation and Curation of Africana/Black Studies Digital Resources
  •   Africana/Black Studies & Software Design and Modeling
  •   Africana/Black Studies & New/Social Media
  •   Game Studies, Digital Humanities & Africana/Black Studies
  •   Africana Studies: Intersections of the Humanities and Social SciencesThe deadline for individual and panel abstract submission is June 6, 2016. Abstract submissions of up to 250 words should be sent to:

    Ronald J. Stephens, Director, African American Studies and Research Center

    Purdue University
    College of Liberal Arts, School of Interdisciplinary Studies 29th Symposium on Philosophy & Culture
    Steven Beering Hall, Room 6176
    100 North University Street
    West Lafayette, IN 47907-2098
    Or email: [email protected] with abstract in the subject line.

Digital Platforms Meet Infrastructures: Characterizing Complex Data Configurations

The Center for Global Culture and Communication,

an interdisciplinary initiative of Northwestern University’s School of Communication,

and

The Buffett Institute for Global Studies at Northwestern University

present:

Jean-Christophe Plantin

(London School of Economics)

Digital Platforms Meet Infrastructures:

Characterizing Complex Data Configurations

Monday, April 18, 2016

4:00-5:30pm 

Frances Searle Building, Room 3-417

(Reception to Follow)

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1672845666310152/

Abstract: Two theoretical approaches are available to characterize data-driven objects of study: infrastructure studies and platform studies. While scholarship in the former emphasizes robustness, reliability, transparency, and breakdown, the latter insists on programmability, data flows, and connecting heterogeneous actors. How do these concepts and fields relate? How do they differ in terms of scale, fields of investigation, and analytical power? Which objects, and which methods of investigation, do they bring to the fore? Are they complementary, or oppositional — or are they basically the same thing?

To answer these questions, this talk will characterize digital platforms through their complex interactions with existing infrastructures. Using literature from STS, communication studies and management, along with case studies from citizen science, scientific data sharing, and open data initiatives, it will first show the different configurations this encounter can take: opposition, cooperation, or mutual influence between the two entities. Second, it will show the consequences these configurations have on shaping access to information, knowledge production, and circulation and valuation of data.

Biography: Dr. Jean-Christophe Plantin is an Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science, department of Media & Communications. His research investigates the civic use of mapping platforms, the collaborative challenges in big data science, and the political implications of data science. His work has been published in Media, Culture & Society, International Journal of Communication, and Digital Humanities Quarterly.

This talk is a part of the Northwestern University and London School of Economics Initiative, sponsored by the Center for Global Culture and Communication and the Buffett Institute for Global Studies at Northwestern University.

CFP: DH Chicago: New Archival Knowledges (May 19-20, 2016)

CALL FOR PAPERS
DHChicago: New Archival Knowledges
University of Chicago, May 19-20, 2016
Organized by the Macroanalysis & the Humanities Working Group
DHChicago seeks to bring together scholars from across the Chicagoland area and across the disciplines to present work on one of the most promising areas of the digital humanities: macroanalysis, or the computational analysis of textual data and metadata. We are specifically looking for presenters whose work engages with questions, some of which may include:
  • What new knowledges can computational approaches produce about large cultural archives?
  • How can we fold these knowledges back into existing debates within the humanities?
  • How compatible are humanistic questions and computational methods?
The broader goal of DHChicago is to lay the groundwork for longer-term intellectual support by fostering inter-institutional and inter-departmental ties, connecting scholars to new resources, and creating new networks of potential interlocutors and collaborators for future endeavors. To this end, the conference de-privileges displays of expertise and erudition in favor of a practical, “under the hood” approach. We welcome presentations on ongoing as well as finished projects, and we encourage presenters to talk about the process of building their projects from the bottom up. What problem does the project address? Why did you choose a certain method to engage this problem? How did you arrive at a particular visual representation of your research?
Daniel Shore will deliver a keynote address on Thursday afternoon from his forthcoming work,Cyberformalism (Johns Hopkins UP). The conference will take place on Friday. Shore will also be leading a workshop that day on the syntactical analysis of regular expressions. Please email us to sign up to attend the workshop.
Proposals are due by April 29, 2016 and should include: a title, abstract of up to 250 words, and, in the email, the author’s name, a C.V., institutional affiliation, and email address. For more information, please contact Sarah Kunjummen and Jonathan Schroeder at [email protected] or visit our website.
Jonathan Schroeder | The University of Chicago | Department of English Language & Literature