Part Two: Soldiers and School

Northwestern University Bulletins

Notes on the Northwestern University Bulletins

In the early 20th century, legal education was undergoing an intense transformation as admissions requirements and course programs were becoming increasingly rigorous. These three issues of the Northwestern University Bulletin cover the Law School’s attempt to adapt to the new, higher standards through an increase in admissions and course requirements.

At the time, the principal degree offered by the Law School was the LL.B., or “Bachelor of Laws.” This three-year program allowed graduates to practice law, although they could choose to pursue advanced degrees, such as a Juris Doctor, Master of Law, or Master of Arts or Science (with an emphasis in law) if they wished.

The proposed changes, which were at the forefront in the field, included raising the admissions criteria to require at least three years of undergraduate coursework at an approved institution; barring this, candidates having attended an unapproved institution could take an examination, and a limited number who only possessed a high school education could be eligible provided they were over 22 years old and maintained a presence on the Law School Honor List.

Additionally, the coursework leading up to an LL.B. was also increased to four years’ of study. As a legal education was intended to take no more than seven years, including undergraduate coursework, this provided two main options for prospective students: three years’ undergraduate study with four years’ law,  or four years’ undergraduate study with three years’ law. Either option allowed students the possibility to pursue an LL.B. and/or a J.D., but this curricular structure encouraged the latter to replace the former as the first degree in law.

As these issues show, these new standards were intended to take effect in September 1918. However, with the advent of the war, the Law School found itself in a difficult position, with many of its constituents in the service. In the end, duty to country proved more important than immediate innovation, and the new requirements were postponed until after the war was over.

Northwestern University Bulletin, 1917

Transcription of the Northwestern University Bulletin, 10 February 1917 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY BULLETIN Vol. XVII, No. XXIII February 10, 1917 Northwestern University Bulletin is published every week by the University at Evanston, Illinois. Entered at the post...

Northwestern University Bulletin, 1919

Transcription of the Northwestern University Bulletin, 6 December 1919 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY BULLETIN VOL. XX, No. 23          December 6, 1919   THE FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM IN LAW On December 7, 1918, the Executive Committee of the Association of American Law...

Northwestern Bulletin, 1922

Transcription of the Northwestern University Bulletin, 1922 NORTHWESTERN University Bulletin Vol. XXIII August 26, 1922 No. 8 Northwestern University Bulletin is published weekly during the academic year at Chicago, Illinois. Entered as Second Class Matter November...

Tokens of Service

Alumni War Fund Subscription Cards, 1917

World War I had a dramatic impact on enrollment at the Law School. At the height of the war, 364 students left school to enlist, and enrollment dropped by as much as 50%. The resulting reduction in revenue left the Law School operating on a large...

Law School Service Chart, ca. 1917

This handmade chart on chipboard likely hung in the halls of the Law School during World War I as a means for students to keep track of their professors and classmates who were serving in the war. Several such boards were made in the first half of the 20th century to...

Letter from James Henderson to Wigmore, 27 December 1917

Wigmore maintained a correspondence with many Northwestern Law students and alumni who served in the war. In this letter, alumnus James Henderson was writing to thank Wigmore not only for his holiday message, but for putting in a good word that helped secure...

Postcard from S. E. Basinski to Wigmore, 3 October 1918

Stansilaus Edward Basinski was one of the many law students, both past and present, who kept in touch with Wigmore from their stations around the world. Basinski himself was stationed in Châlus, a small, historic town in the southwest of France, where he served as a...

Wartime Newsletters

Notes on the Wartime Newsletters

During the war, enrollment at the Law School sank by approximately one-third, as many students entered the service. Understandably, their absence was felt among those who remained at home and continued with their studies. In an effort to build morale and maintain contact, two newsletters were created and distributed among the Northwestern Law community around the world.

The Pi Epsilon Delta Bugle was started by the men in one of the Law School’s several Greek societies. Edited by the their appointed “Secretary of War,” this newsletter solicited, compiled, and circulated letters from Northwestern Law soldiers around the world—largely fellow brothers, although all were welcome to read and reply. The two issues presented here are the first two of the publication; while others may have followed, these are our only extant copies.

The second newsletter looks deceptively like the first. However, this inconsistently titled  publication, sometimes called Soldiers’ News Letter and sometimes Northwestern University Law School News Letter, was actually a separate project assembled by the Dean’s Office. Although at least one source credits Wigmore in its inception, it seems likely that this production was the responsibility of his secretary, Mary Goodhue. Like the Pi Epsilon Delta Bugle, this newsletter shared updates from the men in the field, as well as highly complementary briefs on Wigmore’s activities.

One especially striking aspect of both publications are the letters written by soldiers who express such eagerness to fight overseas. Several complain of being stuck in training camps or on kitchen duty, while others celebrate receiving their commission to join their peers on the front lines. Of course, others seemed content to remain in safer conditions—as one soldier wrote from Cuba, “We don’t know what we’re here for, and most of us don’t care. We are quite well fed and housed; work very hard – what more should one want in war time?”—these were the exception, not the rule.

 

Pi Epsilon Delta Newsletters

Pi Epsilon Delta Newsletter, Issue 1, ca. 1917

Transcription of the Pi Epsilon Delta Newsletter, Issue 1 (ca. 1917) Foreword: To the Northwestern men everywhere: The Pi Epsilon Delta legal fraternity, Northwestern Chapter, has decided upon publishing a monthly service letter to its men in the National Service. The...

Pi Epsilon Delta Newsletter, Issue 2, ca. 1917

Transcription of the Pi Epsilon Delta Newsletter, Issue 2 THE PI EPSILON DELTA BUGLE Vol I. No. 2 Dear Brothers in Arms: In sending forth this second number of the PI EPSILON DELTA BUGLE I do so with the consciousness that our work has not been unappreciated. I have...

Soldiers’ Newsletters

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 23 July 1917

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 23 July 1917 SOLDIERS’ NEWS LETTER NO. 3. NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL MONDAY, JULY 23rd, 1917 My dear friends: Three communications have gone out to you – two newsletters and a marching song – all from...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 1 August 1917

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 1 August 1917 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL NEWS LETTER No. 4 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1 , 1917   Honored Sirs all:- It has now become our painful duty to speak of the weather! It’s “)/$+ec-:§%$^;(:??? and then...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 19 September 1917

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 19 September 1917 SOLDIERS’ NEWS LETTER No. [?] September 19, 1917 Dear friends: After a lapse of several weeks another news budget is starting on its way. It goes out with a considerably reduced mailing list, due to the...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 23 October 1917

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 23 October 1917 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL NEWS LETTER NO. 7 October 23, 1917. To Our Friends and Former School-Mates: School has “taken up” once more . The 8:45 a m. bell finds breathless stragglers...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 10 December 1917

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 10 December 1917 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL NEWS LETTER NO. 8 December 10, 1917 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL! A MERRY CHRISTMAS to the boys in the U.S.A.! We had hoped to make this a Merry Christmas for you all,...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 26 February 1918

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 26 February 1918 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL NEWS LETTER NO. 10. February 26th, 1918 We have received many sweet messages and brilliant reflections from our Soldiers Boys; no doubt prompted by the...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 29 March 1918

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 29 March 1918 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL NEWS LETTER NO. 11.         March 29, 1918 My dear friends: Northwestern University Law School has great cause to be proud of its part – thus far – in the war....

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 2 July 1918

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 2 July 1918 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL Newsletter No. 13 July 2nd, 1918 Dear Patriots All: Again there has been an unavoidably long lapse between newsletters. Commencement has come in between, when the Law School...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 1 August 1918

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 1 August 1918 NORTHWESTERN LAW SCHOOL News Letter No. 14 August 1, 1918 To our boys Over There – our greetings, and assurances of our great pride and glory in your valor and steadfastness in upholding the honor and...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 14 September 1918

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 14 September 1918 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL NEWS LETTER NO. 15 Sept. 14, 1918   Friends and Fellow-countrymen: Lend us your eyes and attention, while we knit into one tale various yarns spun by you and your...

Soldiers’ Newsletter, 29 October 1918

Transcription of the Soldiers' Newsletter, 29 October 1918 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL News letter No. 16 October 29, 1918   To Our Soldiers, “Here” and “There”: The N.U.L.S. S.A.T.C. is now on, full blast! Sentries pace up and...