Skip to main content

Southern Life and African American History, 1775-1915, Plantation Records, Parts 1 and 2

ProQuest History Vault, Southern Life and African American History, 1775-1915, Plantation Records, Part 1

The Plantation Records in this module documents the far-reaching impact of plantations on both the American South and the nation. Plantation Records are both business records and personal papers because the plantation was both the business and the home for plantation owners. Business records include ledger books, payroll books, cotton ginning books, work rules, account books, and receipts. Personal papers include family correspondence, diaries, and wills. As business owners, the commodities produced by plantation owners–rice, cotton, sugar, tobacco, hemp, and others–accounted for more than half of the nation’s exports. The records presented in this module come from the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina; Maryland Historical Society; Howard-Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane University; Louisiana State Museum; and the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Louisiana State University Libraries. – Publisher

ProQuest History Vault, Southern Life and African American History, 1775-1915, Plantation Records, Part 2

The records presented in Southern Life and African American History, 1775-1915, Plantation Records: Part 2, come from the holdings of the University of Virginia and Duke University. One of the extraordinary collections from the University of Virginia, especially for the study of slavery, is the papers of General John Hartwell Cocke. Major collections from the Duke University holdings document plantation life in the Alabama, as well as South Carolina, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland. Records from Alabama and Mississippi depict the opening of the southern frontier in response to the cotton boom of the early 19th century. – Publisher