Fall NUDHL meeting: Nov 17, 12-2pm

Please join NUDHL for our fall meeting:

Big Data and the Sharing Economy: A Look from Thailand

A NUDHL workshop by Professor Soraj Hongladarom

Big data and the sharing economy are two of the most salient aspects of today’s world. This is true not only in the West, but increasingly so in a developing country like Thailand. Assessing the ethical impact of these emerging technologies take on further complications when it is done in the context of these local cultures. In the talk I will briefly lay out some of the contexts and backgrounds of the problem and then present my analysis, which will be based on insights obtained from Buddhist philosophy as well as from living in the developing world.

Soraj Hongladarom is a professor of philosophy and director of the Center for Ethics of Science and Technology, Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He has been working on the more applied areas of philosophy for more than two decades and his focus is on how technology and culture interact, especially with respect to ethical dimensions. Among his works are The Online Self and A Buddhist Theory of Privacy, both published by Springer in 2016. Currently he is completing is a research project as part of an agreement between Indiana University and Chulalongkorn University in Bloomington, Indiana on Spinoza and Buddhism.

Friday, Nov 17 12-2 at the Alice Kaplan Humanities Institute.

Noodles will be served.

Lisa Gitelman, Emoji Dick and Emoji Dickinson

Emoji Dick and Emoji Dickinson

Lisa Gitelman

Department of Media, Culture, and Communication New York University

Friday, 12 May 2017, noon-2pm
Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities Seminar Room Kresge 2-350

This talk takes a 2010 “translation” of Moby Dick into emoji as an opportunity to consider the conditions of possibility that might delimit books and literature in the contemporary moment. A massive white codex and extended work of crowd-sorcery, “Emoji Dick” points toward the varieties of reading and—especially—of not reading that characterize our ever more digitally mediated and data-described world. Here I proceed by locating “Emoji Dick” alongside an absurd sequel, “Emoji Dickinson.”

Professor Lisa Gitelman is a media historian whose research concerns American book history, techniques of inscription, and the new media of yesterday and today. She is currently chair of NYU’s Department of Media, Culture, and Communication.

All welcome regardless of digital humanities experience. “Noodle” lunch served.

Questions? Contact NUDHL co-convener Jillana Enteen, j-enteen@northwestern.edu, or visit nudhl.net. NUDHL is supported by the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities and cosponsored by the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program.

Gitelman Talk Poster pdf

Spenserworlds & Great Lakes Native Writing

Spenserworlds & Great Lakes Native Writing:

Literary Studies Meet Digital Humanities

Reflections on Two Digitally Enhanced English Courses

 

Dr. Kasey Evans & Dr. Kelly Wisecup

Department of English, Northwestern University

Friday, 17 March 2017, noon-2pm

Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities Seminar Room

Kresge 2-350

Two faculty members who participated in Northwestern’s Digital Humanities Summer Faculty Workshop offer an update on their digital pedagogy.

Focusing on the radicalism of Spenser’s gender politics, the experimentality of his literary form, and the subversiveness of (some of!) his political agenda, Kasey Evans and her students explore Spenser’s supposed traditionalism through the potential transformations of a multimedia, interactive approach to his work. Can the “sage and serious Spenser,” as John Milton called him, be re-enlivened through the creation and curation of an online archive of texts, commentary, explication, illustrations, in short a digital “Spenserworlds”?

Working on Native American literary studies, Kelly Wisecup discusses the use of digital mapping and archiving platforms in the classroom and how they might be used to engage with literary studies and museum studies. How might digital resources be incorporated into place-based teaching?

The meeting will feature short presentations followed by a discussion.

All welcome regardless of digital humanities experience. Refreshments provided. Questions? Contact NUDHL co-convener Jillana Enteen, j-enteen@northwestern.edu, or visit nudhl.net.

DePaul DH

Some great talks coming up from our friends at DePaul’s new Studio χ

“Foundations of the Digital, Foundations in the Humanities: Race, Gender, Class”
(Updated information at: http://las.depaul.edu/centers-and-institutes/studio-chi/Pages/default.aspx studiochi-flyer-2016)

Tara McPherson and Philip Ethington (University of Southern California):
“The Digital, the Humanities, and Difference”
Thursday, January 19, 2017; 4:30PM
Location: Lincoln Park Campus, 1110 W. Belden Ave., McGowan South 108

Thomas Haigh (University of Wisconsin/Madison):
“Working on ENIAC: Memory, Labor and Gender in the Early Digital”
February 23, 2017; 6:00 PM
Location Loop Campus TBA

Kim Gallon (Purdue University):
“Technologies of Recovery: A Critical Examination of a Black DH Genealogy”
Thursday, March 30, 2017; 5:00 PM
Location Lincoln Park TBA

Dianne Harris (University of Utah):
“Large Data: Shaping an Architectural History of Race and the Suburbs from 70,000 Pieces of Evidence”
Thursday, May 18, 2017; 5:00 PM
Location Lincoln Park TBA

Juan Saldariagga, Center for Spatial Research (Columbia University):
“Conflict Urbanism”
Friday, June 2, 2017; 12:00 PM
Location Lincoln Park TBA

studiochi-flyer-2016

Transcultur@ — Transatlantic Cultural History, 1700-Present: A Digital Investigation

Transcultur@

Transatlantic Cultural History, 1700-Present: A Digital Investigation

Monday, 24 October 2016, 6 pm

Harris Hall L40

atlantic-ocean-map 

Please join Project Directors Anaïs Fléchet (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France) and Gabriela Pellegrino Soares (University of São Paulo, Brazil) as well as US Group Leaders Michael J. Kramer (Northwestern University) and Richard Candida Smith (University of California, Berkeley) for a brief introduction to this new digital history/humanities project followed by an opportunity to discuss the project. Faculty and students in all fields welcome. Food and drink provided.

What is Transcultur@? An international collaborative research project led by a Franco-Brazilian team of scholars in the humanities, social sciences, arts, and literature. Its purpose is to produce a “Dictionary” of Transatlantic Cultural History: an online exploration, edited in four languages (English, French, Spanish, and Portuguese), whose aim is to analyze the cultural dynamics of the Atlantic Area and its central role in the modern processes of globalization. Questions? Please contact Michael J. Kramer, History/American Studies/Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory, mjk@northwestern.edu.

Funding provided by Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory; Chabraja Center for Historical Studies; Buffet Institute for Global Studies; Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities; France Berkeley Fund; The Institut des Amériques, the Institut Universitaire de France, the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, the European Research Council, and the Fundação de Amparo ao Pesquisador do Estado de São Paulo.

transcultur-meeting-monday-10-24-16 (Flier PDF)

Fr 10/07/16 10am: Smiljana Antonijević Ubois, Amongst Digital Humanists

Amongst Digital Humanists: Developing Research Capacities in Digital Scholarship

Smiljana Antonijević Ubois

Penn State University/Royal Netherlands Academy

cover

Friday, 07 October 2016, 10:00—11:45 am

Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, Kresge Hall

Smiljana Antonijević Ubois, PhD, explores the intersection of communication, culture, and technology through research and teaching in the U.S. and Europe. Smiljana’s most recent publications include “Developing Research Tools via Voices from the Field” (ACRL, 2016), Amongst Digital Humanists: An Ethnographic Study of Digital Knowledge Production (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), “Personal Library Curation” (The John Hopkins University Press, 2014), and “Working in Virtual Knowledge” (MIT Press, 2013). Her latest research projects are Digital Scholarly Workflow, the Pennsylvania State University; Alfalab: eHumanities Tools and Resources, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW); Digitizing Words of Power, University of Amsterdam; and Humanities Information Practices, a collaboration of the KNAW, Oxford Internet Institute, and University College London. For more information see www.smiljana.org.

All welcome regardless of digital humanities experience. Coffee and snacks provided.

Questions? Contact NUDHL co-convener Michael Kramer, mjk@northwestern.edu or visit nudhl.net.

5/27: NUDHL Reading Group – Between Humanities and the Digital, Part III

BETWEEN HUMANITIES AND THE DIGITAL, PART III

Svennson Goldberg BT Digital Humanities

eds. Patrik Svensson and David Theo Goldberg (MIT Press, 2015)


Friday, 5/27, 10am-noon (Rescheduled from 5/20)

PART III – (pp. 329-506)

*held in Gender and Sexuality Studies Program Conference Room, 1800 Sherman Avenue, 4th floor*


The Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory invites those interested in this emerging field of interdisciplinary scholarship to join us for a three-part reading group.

No previous digital humanities experience required.

Books are available for free at the AKIH to interested faculty, students, and staff. 

Attend one or all discussions as your schedule and interests permit.

Please email NUDHL co-convener Michael Kramer, mjk@northwestern.edu, with any questions.

4/29/16: Whitney Trettien, Harmonizing Difference in the Digital Archive

Harmonizing Difference in the Digital Archive

Dr. Whitney Trettien

Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Trettien Little Gidding 3Trettien Little Gidding 4Trettien Little Gidding 5

Friday, 29 April 2016, noon – 2 pm.

Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, 1800 Sherman Avenue

Lunch provided. Please RSVP to NUDHL co-convener Michael Kramer, mjk@northwestern.edu.

All welcome regardless of digital humanities experience.

DESCRIPTION

In 1625, Nicholas Ferrar and his mother Mary left London to found the Anglican community of Little Gidding. There, in an early modern “makerspace” known as the Concordance Room, the women of the community hacked religious books: they chopped apart printed Bibles and engravings with scissors, then pasted these paper fragments back together into elaborate collages of text and image that remix, or “harmonize,” the four Gospels. Together, these thirteen cut-and-paste volumes—comprising perhaps the largest early modern archive of English women’s bookwork—are known as the Little Gidding Harmonies, and they are the subject of Trettien’s digital monograph, “Cut/Copy/Paste: Echoes of Little Gidding.”

Patriarchal assumptions and print-mediated research practices have long obscured the women of Little Gidding’s cross-disciplinary, transatlantic contributions to history. Cutting through these obfuscations, “Cut/Copy/Paste” reconstitutes the community’s scattered fragments through the creation of a digital Concordance Room. There, readers may “harmonize” high-resolution facsimiles of these rare books with a wealth of archival materials. In this talk, Trettien connects this project’s design to broader methodological interventions in the fields of book history, media archaeology, and digital humanities. As objects like the Harmonies underscore, books do not clearly represent the time of their creation but come to us accreted with precarious, uneven evidence of many moments and multiple hands. Attending to these discontinuities in digital spaces requires what Karen Barad, following Donna Haraway, has described as a diffractive approach. Rather than smoothing over striations of difference, diffractive digital design illuminates and constellates a diversity of moments, objects, and ideas—much as the women of Little Gidding do in their kaleidoscopic Harmonies.

For more, see “FAQs on the Little Gidding Harmonies.”

BIO

Whitney Trettien (http://whitneyannetrettien.com) is assistant professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she teaches book history, digital humanities, and Renaissance literature. She is co-editor of Provoke! Digital Sound Studies (http://soundboxproject.com), a digital collection of sonic scholarship, and co-editor of thresholds (http://openthresholds.org), a new digital journal and platform for creative/critical scholarship.

4/22: NUDHL Reading Group Part II

DIGITAL HUMANITIES READING GROUP

<<All welcome. No DH expertise or experience required. Attend one or all gatherings.>>

BETWEEN HUMANITIES AND THE DIGITAL

Svennson Goldberg BT Digital Humanities

eds. Patrik Svensson and David Theo Goldberg

(MIT Press, 2015)

The Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory invites those interested in this emerging field of interdisciplinary scholarship to join us for a three-part reading group. No previous digital humanities experience required. Books are available for free at the AKIH to interested faculty, students, and staff. Attend one or all discussions as your schedule and interests permit.

Friday, 4/22, 10 am—noon: Part II (pp. 173-328)

(with particular focus on Whitney Anne Trettien’s essay, “Circuit-Bending History” as she joins us next Friday, 4/29, noon-2 pm.)

Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, 1800 Sherman Ave. 1st Floor Seminar Room

Light refreshments, coffee, tea will be served.

Please email NUDHL co-convener Michael Kramer, mjk@northwestern.edu, with any questions.

Final reading group meeting: Friday, 5/27, 10 am—noon: Part III (pp. 329-506), held in the Gender and Sexuality Studies Conference Room, 1800 Sherman Avenue

Triple Canopy Publication Intensive Opportunity

Publication Intensive

June 6–17, 2016
Apply online through Monday, April 11 

What: A two-week program in the history and contemporary practice of publication.

Where: The program will take place at Triple Canopy’s venue in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and will include visits to studios of artists and designers, archives, and cultural institutions.

Who: We invite applications from higher-level college students, graduate students, and recent college graduates. Prospective participants might have backgrounds in areas such as writing, art, literature, art history, new media, and design.

Cost: Tuition is free, though participants must arrange and pay for their travel and accommodation. All reading and viewing materials will be provided free of cost.

During the Publication Intensive, Triple Canopy editors and invited artists, writers, and technologists will lead discussions and workshops with participating students, who will research, analyze, and enact an approach to publication that hinges on today’s networked forms of production and circulation but also mines the history of print culture and artistic practice.

The Publication Intensive will address such questions as: How have artists, writers, and designers used the pages of magazines and books as sites of and material for experimentation? How have new-media publications challenged conventions of authorship and reception, only to have those very challenges soon become the foundation of the new economy? How have artists, writers, designers, and technologists responded to ensuing changes in the media landscape? And how have responses differed in areas with disparate resources and relationships to technology? What are the politics of access and identity associated with online public forums and media?

Read more

Triple Canopy’s Arts Education Initiative is generously supported by the Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston.