Water into the depths of the Earth

[Leer en Español]

Return to previous post

Ringwoodite blue crystal ~ 150 micrometers wide. Microphotograph taken at the University of Hawaii of a specimen grown in Bayreuth, Germany. Author: Joseph Smyth . Header image: The blue ringwoodite material. Steve Jacobsen, 2014.

Ringwoodite is the most common mineral phase in the lower transition zone of the Earth’s mantle, at depths of 525 to 660 km. This ringwoodite crystal contains about 1% water. If the whole ringwoodite of the mantle contains this amount of water, it is estimated that there is almost three times as much water in the mantle as in all the oceans combined!

Cross section of the planet Earth ( Pearson et al, 2014 ). Credit image: Kathy Mather.

At closer look into the cross section of the planet Earth we can identify the transition zone that separates the upper mantle from the lower mantle. Right there, diamonds are formed and together with the included ringwoodite -which in turn traps the water molecules- both minerals continue their journey to the surface through volcanic activity.

The first discovery on Earth of ringwoodite inside a diamond was made by an international team led by the University of Alberta and could indicate the presence of large amounts of water between 410 and 660 km below the Earth’s surface.

Credit: University of Alberta. Source: phys.org.

The diamond found in Brazil originated approximately 550 km below the earth’s surface, where large masses of water can accumulate by subduction and by the advance and recycling of the ocean floor towards the transition zone. The results of these investigations were published in 2014 by Pearson et al. (2014) in the journal Nature.

Schematic model of subduction of oceanic crust altered by seawater and the infiltration of brines into the base of the deep continental root beneath NWT, Canada, to make fluid-rich diamonds.

“What we appear to be finding more and more is that the standard model that used to be around—diamonds are only formed in very ancient times, 3.5 billion years ago, by a very specific process—is not true,” says Pearson. “There are more processes that form diamonds at a whole range of different times than we thought possible.”

Earth Section

Cross section of the Earth’s interior.

Simultaneously, the study by Steve Jacobsen and Brandon Schmandt used seismic waves to find magma generated at the base of the transition zone, around 600 km deep. Dehydration melting at those conditions, observed in the study’s high-pressure experiments, also suggests the transition zone may contain oceans worth of H2O dissolved in high-pressure rock. The findings alter previous assumptions about the Earth’s composition.

Previous:

Water on Planet Earth: Aquatic biogeochemistry


Suggested readings:

Water on Planet Earth: Aquatic biogeochemistry

[Leer en Español]

The part of the hydrology called oceanography (division is arbitrary) studies the ocean and other water bodies from the aquatic point of view. It is closely related to at least four basic areas: physics, chemistry, biology and geology, as well as limnology, meteorology and glaciology, which confers a unique multidisciplinary flavor.

Spheres. Modified from: Brian J. Skinner and Barbara W. Murck, 2011. The Blue Planet: An Introduction to Earth System Science. 3rd Edition. John Wiley & Sons.

However, in our planet the ocean and aquatic systems are integrated into one, constantly interacting and exchanging materials with other spheres. Depending on  the type of processes that we want to understand, it also does change the way of studying them. Although the analytical approach, to separate the parts of reality to study it is very useful, for the deep understanding of it is necessary to perform the synthesis, that is, the reintegration of information.

In contrast, the term “aquatic biogeochemistry” refers to the physical, biological and geological aspects that are inevitably associated with chemical processes in the bodies of water on Earth. It emphasizes the biogeochemical cycles of the elements, that is, their exchange between spheres and their physical and chemical transformations along the way. In addition, it encompasses all types of aquatic systems other than the ocean that exist in our planet such as rivers, lakes, reservoirs, ponds, estuaries, fjords, cenotes, coastal lagoons, coral reefs, mangrove swamps, wetlands, and underground deposits.

A molecule of water at the bottom of Lake Chapala may eventually fall as rain on the Tuxtlas in Veracruz. It may be carried by the Papaloapan River to the Gulf of Mexico, where it will later drain into the Atlantic Ocean through the Labrador current and probably continue its way to the north, near Iceland where, after evaporating and precipitating in the form of snow, it becomes part of a glacier for thousands of years. Other molecules, are dragged to great depths under the terrestrial crust, where they are mixed with the magma and come back in the form of vapor or within mineral inclusions in diamonds after a volcanic eruption. One of those molecules can be carried by the wind, to once again precipitate – after millions of years – in the lake of Chapala (if it’s that still exists of course, although it would surely have moved a few kilometers away).

Water on Earth

One of the central questions of hydrology is: What is the origin of water on Earth? Where did it come from? All the water currently present on the surface of the Earth comes from its interior (although there is discussion in this, since it was formerly thought that it came from comets that have collided with our planet and a minimum amount could have come from this source indeed), which has been progressively liberating since Earth’s formation about 4,600 million years ago. Although this process is still ongoing, it is estimated that the water that formed the current oceans and atmosphere had already surfaced from the interior about 2,500 million years ago, and that the current degassing rate is much lower.

A drop in the Ocean

Viewed from outer space, Earth has been called the Blue Planet. But if you could pull all the water in the ocean, the atmosphere, groundwater and surface water into a ball, it would measure only about 950 miles (1,500 kilometers) in diameter (the large sphere). Only about 3 percent of the world’s water is fresh (the mid-sized sphere); and of that, only one-third is easily accessible to humans (the small sphere).

Illustration by Jack Cook, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Watch a video illustrating this surprising scarcity, explore the water cycle, and read more here.

The difference with other planets, in terms of water content, would be because they could not retain it on its surface and the water escaped to the space. More recently, with the discovery of a diamond formed 600 km deep in the transition zone of the Earth’s mantle, which contains an inclusion of the mineral ringwoodite and several water molecules (this mineral can contain between 1-3% water by weight) strengthened the hypothesis that water from lakes, rivers and oceans came from the interior of the planet. If the entire ringwoodite of the mantle contains this amount of water, it is estimated that there is almost three times as much deep water in the mantle as in all the oceans combined. This also implies that the hydrological cycle penetrates hundreds of kilometers below the surface of the Earth, with residence times in depth on a scale of millions of years.

Credit: University of Alberta. Source: phys.org

 

The first Earth discovery of ringwoodite was made by an international team led by the University of Alberta and could indicate the presence of large amounts of water between 400 and 700 km below the Earth’s surface.

Next:

Speleogenesis: How were caves and cenotes formed?

Cover photography by Jill Heinerth

[Leer en Español]

One of the distinctive features of the northern Yucatan Peninsula is its almost flat topography, lacking valleys or mountains, and altitudes that barely exceeds 30 meters. The soil type consists mainly of limestone, or saskab (Maya word for “white soil”), which contains calcium and magnesium carbonates that are slightly soluble in water.

Millions of years ago the Peninsula was very different from how we know it today, as it has undergone radical modifications due to climatic and sea level changes on the planet. An example of these changes was during the Last Glacial Maximum at the peak of the Ice Age – about 22,000 years ago – when the sea level was 120 meters below its current level, and many of the cenotes in which we can snorkel and dive today were dry. Since then, the level of the sea has been progressively increasing more or less gradually and many caves were flooded.

The portion that we inhabit today above sea level of the Yucatan Peninsula, is only the exposed part of the carbonate platform that was steadily growing from the seabed by accumulation of millions of skeletons of different marine organisms that use calcium carbonate to form their bones, shells, spicules and other parts of the body. Upon dying, they deposit on the bottom surface to compact and harden together with fine clays over millions of years. It is important to recognize that the growth of the platform happens through the deposition of biogenic carbonate, sourcing from living organisms, and moreover, that it involves a process that necessarily happens underwater across the submerged areas.

Peninsula_APSA

Figure 1. The Yucatan Peninsula is the portion that we observe above sea level of the Yucatan Platform, which has a much larger area. In the Riviera Maya on the eastern coast of Quintana Roo, the change in depth is very abrupt compared to northern Yucatan and the Campeche Sound towards the Gulf of Mexico, where the shallow platform extends for several kilometers. Bathymetry: General Directorate of Oceanography, Ministry of the Navy (YUCATAN ’85). SRTM model of elevation: NASA (2000).

Sea level has changed position several times during different glacial periods; therefore, the growing Peninsula has not really “emerged from the sea” but has been exposed and submerged by the ocean on several occasions. However, it is recognized that every time a glacial cycle begins, the Peninsula effectively “emerges”, since the water of the oceans accumulates in the form of ice at the poles of the planet and the sea level drops, exposing a greater surface and increasing the coastline extent.

Figure 2. Changes in sea level during the last 800,000 years. The present is on the right. LFI (Last Full Interglacial); LGM (Last Glacial Maximum). Data from Siddall et al (2003).

Currently, the term cenote is used to designate any underground space filled with water that contains a window to the outside. The Maya people, who not only had knowledge of these manifestations of the land but used them daily as a source of water and farming, called them ts’ono’ot or d’zonot, which means “water deposit”. The freshwater supply in the Yucatan Peninsula has been and continues to be a serious problem for its inhabitants. Although more or less abundant rains fall during four months, the period of drought is usually severe and can last up to six months in some years. On the other hand, the calcareous geological origin causes that water is hardly conserved on the surface. For this reason, cenotes and cave systems constitute a primordial source of water for the region.

In the present, although certain practices of veneration subsist, it is clear that it’s meaning is far from what it was for the ancient Maya. Nowadays, its value is mainly associated with tourism. It is known that Quintana Roo has several of the largest cave systems in the world. Recent explorations carried out by divers’ teams have uncovered hundreds of kilometers of underground conduits. Moreover, there is also a large number of dry caves of considerable length. We cannot ignore their existence if we want to coexist with them.

Sneaking into a cave is an unforgettable experience. The caves tell us about geology, biochemistry, paleontology, archeology, and history. Caves motivate us to know them and to think about their future.

Figure 3. Light opening. Quintana Roo / Personal archive. EMR, 2011.

How were cenotes formed?

Speleogenesis is the word used in speleology and geology to describe the mechanism of formation of all kinds of caverns and caves. One of the most accepted hypotheses about the origin of caves, cavities, sinkholes, depressions and cenotes, proposes a sequence of steps in a process called karstification, which consists of the combination of at least three mechanisms: dissolution, collapse and re-crystallization of the limestone.

1) In the first step, the rock is dissolved by rainwater acidified by absorption of the carbon dioxide (CO2) both from the air, as well as from the decomposition of organic matter in the soil (leaves, branches, dead animals, bacteria). When mixed with salt water increases its corrosive power. Where the deep salty and superficial layers of fresh water meet, called halocline, is where the greatest dissolution of limestone happens, forming an extensive network of conducts, caves and caverns. Cave divers can see that generally just above the halocline the caves are generally wider, a sign that the dissolution is greater at that depth and that is a continuous developing process,  still happening.

Read a more detailed description of these reactions

Acidified rainwater dissolves calcium carbonate from limestone more easily and forms calcium bicarbonate, a much more soluble compound. Another type of solution, but of biological origin, is that which occurs inside some deep cenotes where specialized bacteria decompose the organic matter producing hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a powerful corrosive gas, and when dissolved and concentrated on the surface of the halocline, it is observed in the form of a “smokey cloud” that is very toxic for oxygen-breathing organisms like us. Upon contact with the surface layer, which may contain little amounts of dissolved oxygen, hydrogen sulfide is transformed into sulfuric acid (H2SO4), also a strong and corrosive acid.

Figure 4. Karstification mechanisms. Source: McColl et al (2005). Geological Survey of Canada .

2) In the second mechanism, when the sea level has dropped during glacial periods, the hydraulic head of the aquifer, the freshwater lens, also drops leaving submerged caves now full of air where, lacking support, different sections of the roof can collapse forming a sinkhole or cenote. At the end of the glacial period, the poles thawed and sea level rose and many passages and caves were flooded again.

Figure 5. Changes in sea level at the end of the Pleistocene epoch, which began 2.5 million years ago setting up the modern glacial periods. When the sea level changes, the position of the halocline also changes and the cave systems begin to form and extend. Modified by González-González et al (2008) and Blanchon & Shaw (1995).

3) Finally, the third step associated with the process of karstification is responsible for the formation of stalactites, stalagmites, columns and other speleothems, by accumulation of dissolved material sourced by the first step. Degassing is also involved in the formation of speleothems: Water filters through the rocks and enters the cave environment, very different from that of the outside, and expulsion of CO2 from water causes calcium carbonate precipitation (see chemical equations). In the case of flooded caves, this process no longer happens. The degree of karstification depends on factors that operate with different spatial and temporal scale, which allows a great variety of shapes and decorations in the cave systems.

Figure 6. Drop of water with dissolved calcium carbonate, suspended from the central channel of a stalactite. Quintana Roo / Personal archive. EMR, 2015.

Having these mechanisms in mind, we can say that the formation of cenotes is generated through a sequence of events: first of all, a network of passages, conduits and cave system is formed by water carving its way out to the ocean dissolving the carbonate rock. This flooded cave can form a cavern-type cenote due to partial subsidence of the roof. This process advances from above, by infiltration of the rain and from below, by underground circulation. Then, the entire roof collapses forming a cylindrical cenote; if sediments and debris interrupt the flow, a body of stagnant water called aguada, is formed.

The largest dissolution occurs in the halocline zone, the contact between fresh and salt water, which rises or falls depending on the sea level. For this reason there are different levels of horizontal caves (for example, in  Sistema Dos Pisos). By changing the sea level, the halocline moves and begins to dissolve the rock at a different depth, thus beginning another “level” of passages.

The halocline stratifies the cenote: it functions as a physical barrier that isolates the layer of fresh water from the deep saline waters. In the coastal sinkholes, the deep marine layer is not always really stagnant, but can circulate driven by tides and storms through channels connected to the sea (a very clear case is the discharge of the Manatee cenote to the shore in Tankah). We also observe freshwater springs called “ojos de agua” discharging fresh water to the ocean and exchanging salt water along the reef lagoon in Puerto Morelos and on the beaches south of Tulum.

Figure 7. Diagram of the Yucatan Peninsula, where the groundwater is separated into two layers of different salinity and density: the shallow freshwater lens and the deep saline intrusion that filters through the rock. The mixing zone between the two layers is called halocline. SGD: Submarine Groundwater Discharge surfaces creating  freshwater springs at the adjacent coastal ocean. EMR, 2015.

Cenotes are complex aquatic systems generated by the dissolution of carbonates and other minerals in the rock, so in geology they are called dissolution lakes, although in reality some cenotes are more similar to rivers than lakes, since they have connections to underground streams that favor the circulation of water. These types of aquatic systems, where fresh and salt water coexist, are called anchialine.

The intermittent collapses along the different cave systems of the Peninsula create open windows towards the surface where we can enter and dive submerged conduits and passages. Generally the cenotes along the eastern coast of Quintana Roo are formed by the  collapse of roof sections along shallow, extended network of conduits, passages and wide galleries. Popular cavern and cave diving destinations in the Riviera Maya such as Sistema Sac Actun (recently connected to Dos Ojos), Sistema Ox Bel Ha and Sistema Ponderosa  belong to this type of caves. Another type of cenotes, more common in the center of the Peninsula, specially around the Ring of Cenotes, are the so called pit-cenotes (although there are some pit-cenotes in Quintana Roo, for example the Blue Abyss or The Pit, which exceed 120 meters deep) where its formation mechanism surely involves deep water circulation, growing from the bottom up, a process acting from below called hypogenetic.

Cenotes_AGU_a

Figure 8. Comparison of different types of cenotes with different formation mechanisms. Left: Pit-cenotes that predominate in the center of the Peninsula and along the Ring of Cenotes. In them, deep flowing water circulation is probably involved, favoring the dissolution of the rock from below advancing upwards. Right: Morphology of the most common cenotes found in the “Riviera Maya”, the eastern coast of Quintana Roo. These cenotes are the entrance to systems of shallower caves normally presenting wide galleries and branched passages. EMR, 2015.

To achieve a sustainable use of these systems, it would be ideally to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the cenotes, caves, groundwater circulation and its interaction with the rocks that form the aquifer, and the influence of oceanic tides. It is also necessary to evaluate the impact of urban areas and the possible causes of pollution of the only source of fresh water in that area, which is precisely groundwater. Research efforts on study and conservation of the underground network of conduits must occur by convergence between environmental sciences, water sciences, earth sciences, biological sciences, joining forces with local communities, efficient exploitation of resources and, of course, exploration and sustainable use by cave diving.

***

An award-winner picture from Nature’s The best science images of the year 2017 shows a cave diver penetrating the underground aquatic systems in the eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. We can see dead trees resting quietly at the bottom.

ORANGE ABYSS: Heavy rains and run-off from surrounding forests give this underwater cavern — the Cenote Carwash off Tulum on Mexico’s Caribbean coast — its eerie tannic glow.

Credit: Tom St George/Caters News


Suggested way to quote this article:

Monroy-Ríos E (2017) Speleogenesis: How were caves and cenotes formed? Environmental Biogeochemistry – Personal blog. Published on Dec 26, 2017. Accessed: [dd / mm / yy].
http://sites.northwestern.edu/monroyrios/2017/12/26/speleogenesis/


References

Blanchon P & J Shaw (1995) Reef Drowning during the Last Deglaciation: Evidence for Catastrophic Sea-Level Rise and Ice-Sheet Collapse. Geology 23: 4-8.

González-González AH, C Rojas-Sandoval, A Terrazas, M Benavente, W Stinnesbeck, J Aviles, M de los Ríos & E Acevez (2008) The Arrival of Humans on the Yucatan Peninsula: Evidence from Submerged Caves in the State of Quintana Roo, Mexico. Current Research in the Pleistocene. Special Report. 25: 1-24.

NASA (2000) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colored elevation SRTM model of the Yucatan Peninsula.

QRSS (2016) Quintana Roo Speleological Survey. Actualizada el 19 Abril, 2016. Consultada el 15 mayo 2016.

Siddall M, J Chappell & EK Potter (2007) 7. Eustatic sea level during past interglacials. Developments in Quaternary Sciences 7: 75-92.


cave_yo_banner_sm800

El agua en las profundidades de la Tierra

Volver a la publicación anterior

[Read in English]

Cristal azul de Ringwoodita ~150 micrómetros de ancho. Microfotografía tomada en la Universidad de Hawaii de un ejemplar crecido en Bayreuth, Germany. Autor: Joseph Smyth. Imagen encabezado: El material azul ringwoodita. Steve Jacobsen, 2014.

La ringwoodita es la fase mineral más común en la zona de transición inferior del manto terrestre, a profundidades de 520 a 660 km. Este cristal de ringwoodita contiene cerca de 1% de agua. Si toda la ringwoodita del manto contiene esta cantidad de agua, se estima que en el manto hay casi tres veces la cantidad de agua que en todos los océanos juntos.

Corte transversal del planeta Tierra (Perason et al, 2014)
Corte transversal del planeta Tierra (Pearson et al, 2014). Crédito imagen: Kathy Mather.

En la sección transversal del planeta Tierra, podemos identificar la zona de transición que separa el manto superior del inferior. Ahí mismo se forman los diamantes y junto con la ringwoodita —que atrapa a las moléculas de agua—, ambos minerales continúan su viaje hasta la superficie.

El primer descubrimiento en la Tierra de ringwoodita fue realizado por un equipo internacional encabezado por la Universidad de Alberta y podría indicar la presencia de grandes cantidades de agua entre 520 y 660 km de profundidad bajo la superficie terrestre. Crédito: Universidad de Alberta. Fuente : phys.org.

El diamante encontrado  se originó a aproximadamente 520 km bajo la superficie terrestre, donde grandes masas de agua pueden acumularse por subducción de placas océanicas, con el avance y reciclamiento del suelo oceánico hacia la zona de transición del manto. Los resultados de estas investigaciones fueron publicados en 2014 por Pearson et al. (2014) en la revista Nature.


Química líquida: El agua en el planeta Tierra


Lecturas recomendadas:

Earth Section

Schematic cross section of the Earth’s interior. The study by Steve Jacobsen and Brandon Schmandt used seismic waves to find magma generated at the base of the transition zone, around 600 km deep. Dehydration melting at those conditions, also observed in the study’s high-pressure experiments, suggests the transition zone may contain oceans worth of H2O dissolved in high-pressure rock. The findings alter previous assumptions about the Earth’s composition.


Química líquida: El agua en el planeta Tierra

[Read in English]

La parte de la hidrología llamada “oceanografía química” (la división es un producto nuestro) estudia, simplemente, el océano y otros cuerpos de agua desde el punto de vista químico. Se encuentra estrechamente relacionada con al menos cuatro áreas básicas: física, química, biología y geología, además de limnología, meteorología y glaciología, lo que le confiere un sabor multidisciplinario único.

Esferas

Modificado de: Brian J. Skinner and Barbara W. Murck, 2011. The Blue Planet: An Introduction to Earth System Science. 3a Edición. John Wiley & Sons.

Sin embargo, en nuestro planeta el océano y los sistemas acuáticos están integrados en uno solo, lo que cambia es la forma de estudiarlo y el tipo de procesos que deseamos comprender, así que este término no parece ser el más correcto. Si bien el enfoque analítico, de separar las partes de la realidad para estudiarla es muy útil, para la comprensión profunda de ésta es necesaria la síntesis, es decir, la reintegración de la información.

En contraste, el término “biogeoquímica acuática” hace referencia constante a los aspectos físicos, biológicos y geológicos que están inevitablemente asociados a los procesos químicos en los cuerpos de agua de la Tierra. Hace énfasis en los ciclos biogeoquímicos de los elementos. Además, engloba a todos los tipos de sistemas acuáticos distintos al océano que existen en nuestro planeta como ríos, lagos, embalses, cenotes, charcas, estuarios, fiordos, lagunas costeras, ríos subterráneos y humedales.

Una molécula de agua en el fondo del lago de Chapala puede eventualmente caer como lluvia en los Tuxtlas de Veracruz. Podría ser acarreada por el Río Papaloapan hasta el Golfo de México, donde posteriormente drenará en el Océano Atlántico y probablemente siga su camino hacia el norte, cerca de Islandia donde, tras evaporarse y precipitar en forma de nieve, se vuelva parte de un glaciar por miles de años. Otras moléculas, son arrastradas a grandes profundidades bajo la corteza terrestre, donde se mezclan con el magma y vuelven a salir en forma de vapor o dentro de inclusiones minerales tras una erupción volcánica. Una de esas moléculas puede ser arrastrada por el viento, para nuevamente precipitar -después de millones de años- en el lago de Chapala (si es que todavía existe, por supuesto, aunque seguramente se habría desplazado unos cuantos kilómetros).

El agua en el planeta Tierra

Una de las preguntas centrales de la hidrología es, ¿cuál es el origen del agua en la Tierra? ¿De dónde salió? Toda el agua actualmente presente sobre la superficie de la Tierra proviene de su interior (aunque hay discusión en esto, ya que se pensaba que provino de los cometas que han chocado con nuestro planeta y una mínima cantidad pudo provenir de esta fuente), la cual ha ido liberando progresivamente, desde su formación hace 4,600 millones de años. Aunque este proceso aún continúa, se calcula que el agua que formó los océanos y atmósfera actuales había salido ya desde hace 2,500 millones de años, y que la tasa de degasificación actual es mucho menor.

La diferencia con otros planetas, en cuanto al contenido de agua, se debería a que éstos no pudieron retenerla sobre su superficie y el agua escapó al espacio. Más recientemente, con el  descubrimiento de un diamante formado a 600 km de profundidad en la zona de transición del manto terrestre, que contiene una inclusión del mineral ringwoodita y varias moléculas de agua (este mineral puede contener entre 1-3% de agua en peso) se fortalece la hipótesis de que el agua de los lagos, ríos y océanos provino del interior. Si toda la ringwoodita del manto contiene esta cantidad de agua, se estima que en el manto hay casi cinco veces la cantidad de agua que en todos los océanos juntos. Esto implica también que el ciclo hidrológico penetra cientos de kilómetros bajo la superficie de la Tierra, con tiempos de residencia en profundidad en escala de millones de años.

El primer descubrimiento en la Tierra de ringwoodita fue realizado por un equipo internacional encabezado por la Universidad de Alberta  y podría indicar la presencia de grandes cantidades de agua entre 400 y 700 km de profundidad bajo la superficie terrestre.  Crédito: Universidad de Alberta. Fuente : phys.org

Lecturas sugeridas

 Water-rich gem points to vast ‘oceans’ beneath the Earth iconIadAX
iconIadAXNew Evidence for Oceans of Water Deep in the Earth. Water bound in mantle rock alters our view of the Earth’s composition

Press release: Jun 12, 2014


¿Cómo se formaron cuevas y cenotes? Espeleogénesis

Fotografía de Jill Heinerth

[Read in English]

Uno de los rasgos distintivos del norte de nuestra Península de Yucatán es su topografía casi plana, sin valles ni montañas y con altitudes que apenas rebasan los 30 metros. El tipo suelo se compone principalmente de roca caliza, o saskab (tierra blanca), la cual contiene carbonatos de calcio y magnesio que son ligeramente solubles en agua.

Hace millones de años la Península era muy diferente a como la conocemos actualmente, desde entonces ha sufrido modificaciones radicales a causa de cambios climáticos en el planeta. Un ejemplo de estos cambios, fue durante el periodo de la última glaciación o Era de Hielo –hace unos 20,000 años– cuando el nivel del mar se encontraba 120 metros por debajo de su nivel actual y muchos de los cenotes en los que hoy podemos bucear, se encontraban secos. Desde entonces, el nivel del mar ha aumentado más o menos gradualmente hasta donde lo conocemos hoy y muchas cuevas fueron inundadas.

La porción que hoy habitamos por encima del nivel del mar de la Península de Yucatán, es solamente una parte de la plataforma de carbonatos que fue creciendo desde el fondo marino por acumulación de millones de esqueletos de diferentes organismos marinos que utilizan el carbonato de calcio para formar sus huesos, conchas, espículas y otras partes del cuerpo. Al morir, se depositaron sobre la superficie del fondo para compactarse y endurecerse junto con arcillas finas al paso de millones de años. Es importante reconocer que el crecimiento de la plataforma se hace a través de la deposición de carbonato biogénico, es decir, proveniente de organismos vivos y que, además, es un proceso que necesariamente sucede debajo del agua, en la porción que se encuentra sumergida.

Peninsula_APSA

Figura 1. La Península de Yucatán es la porción que observamos sobre el nivel del mar de la Plataforma de Yucatán, que tiene una extensión mucho mayor. En la Riviera Maya sobre la costa oriental de Quintana Roo, el cambio de profundidad es muy abrupto comparado con el norte de Yucatán y la Sonda de Campeche hacia el Golfo de México, donde la plataforma se extiende por varios kilómetros. Batimetría, Dirección General de Oceanografía, Secretaría de Marina (YUCATÁN ’85). Modelo SRTM de elevación (NASA, 2000).

El nivel del mar ha cambiado de posición varias veces durante diferentes periodos glaciales, por lo tanto, la Península en crecimiento en realidad no “emergió del mar” sino que ha sido expuesta y sumergida por el océano en varias ocasiones. Sin embargo, se reconoce que cada vez que comienza un ciclo glaciar, la Península efectivamente “emerge“, ya que el agua de los océanos se acumula en forma de hielo en los polos del planeta y el nivel del mar desciende, dejando expuesta una mayor superficie y la línea de costa aumenta.

Cambios en el nivel del mar en los úlitmos 800,00 años. El presente se encuentra a la derecha. LFI (Last Full Interglacial-Último interglaciar); LGM (Last Glacial Maximum-Último Máximo Glaciar).

Figura 2. Cambios en el nivel del mar durante los últimos 800,000 años. El presente se encuentra a la derecha. LFI (Last Full Interglacial-Último interglaciar); LGM (Last Glacial Maximum-Último Máximo Glaciar). Datos de Siddall et al (2003). 

Actualmente, el término cenote se emplea para designar cualquier espacio subterráneo con agua y que contenga una ventana hacia el exterior. El pueblo maya, que no solamente tenía el conocimiento de estas manifestaciones del terreno sino que los empleaba diariamente como fuente de agua y vida, los llamó ts’ono’ot o d’zonot, que significa “depósito de agua”. El abastecimiento de agua en la Península de Yucatán fue y sigue siendo un grave problema para sus pobladores, pues aunque a lo largo de cuatro meses caen lluvias más o menos abundantes, el periodo de sequía suele ser severo y puede prolongarse hasta seis meses en algunos años. Por otra parte, la constitución geológica calcárea causa de que el agua difícilmente se conserve en la superficie. Por esta razón, los cenotes fueron y seguirán siendo fuente primordial de agua y de vida.

En el presente, aunque subsisten ciertas prácticas de su antigua veneración, es claro que su significado dista mucho de lo que era para los antiguos mayas. Hoy día, su valor está asociado principalmente al turismo. Es conocido que el Estado de Quintana Roo posee varios de los sistemas de cuevas inundadas más grandes del mundo. Exploraciones recientes realizadas por equipos de buzos, han puesto al descubierto cientos de kilómetros de conductos subterráneos. Sin embargo, también cuenta con un gran número de cuevas secas de considerable longitud. No podemos ignorar su existencia si deseamos convivir con ellas.

Figura 3. Entrada de luz. QRoo/ Archivo personal. EMR (2011).

Adentrarse en una cueva es una experiencia inolvidable. Las cuevas nos hablan de geología, bioquímica, paleontología y arqueología. Las cuevas nos enseñan historia, nos motivan a conocerlas y a pensar en su futuro.

¿Cómo se formaron los cenotes?

Espeleogénesis es la palabra que se usa en espeleología y geología para describir el mecanismo de formación de todo tipo de cuevas, cavernas, grutas y cenotes. Una de las hipótesis más aceptadas acerca del origen de cuevas y cenotes, propone una secuencia de pasos en un proceso llamado carstificación, que consiste en la combinación de al menos tres mecanismos: disolución, colapso y crecimiento de la roca caliza.

1) En el primer paso la roca se disuelve por medio del agua de lluvia –acidificada tanto por el dióxido de carbono  (CO2) del aire, como por el proveniente de la descomposición de materia orgánica en el suelo de la selva (hojas, ramas, animales muertos, bacterias)– que al mezclarse con agua salada aumenta su poder corrosivo. Donde se juntan las capas profunda salada y superficial de agua dulce es donde mayor disolución se tiene de roca caliza, formando una extensa red de conductos, cuevas y cavernas que se extiende por el subsuelo. A esta interfase de capas dulce y salada le llamamos haloclina. Las personas que buceamos las cuevas podemos fijarnos que justamente sobre la haloclina las cuevas generalmente son más anchas, una señal de que la disolución es mayor en esa zona y de que sigue ocurriendo, es un proceso continuo y en desarrollo.

Leer una descripción más detallada de estas reacciones 

El agua de lluvia acidificada disuelve más fácilmente al carbonato de calcio de la roca caliza y forma bicarbonato de calcio, una especie mucho más soluble. Otro tipo de disolución, pero de origen biológico, es el que se presenta en el interior de algunos cenotes donde algunas bacterias descomponen la materia orgánica produciendo ácido sulfhídrico (H2S), un poderoso corrosivo que, al disolverse y concentrarse sobre la superficie de la haloclina, se observa en forma de “nube” y resulta tóxico para los organismos que respiramos oxígeno. Al entrar en contacto con las capas superficiales, que pueden contener un poco de oxígeno disuelto, el ácido sulfhídrico se transforma en ácido sulfúrico (H2SO4), también un ácido fuerte y potente corrosivo de la roca caliza.

Figura 4. Mecanismos del proceso de carstificación en continente. Fuente: McColl et al (2005). Geological Survey of Canada.

2) En el segundo mecanismo, cuando el nivel del mar ha bajado durante periodos glaciares, desciende también el nivel del acuífero y deja una cueva llena de aire donde, por falta de soporte, colapsan y desploman diferentes secciones del techo, formando una dolina o cenote. Al final del periodo glaciar, se descongelan los polos, aumenta nuevamente el nivel del mar e inunda la cueva.

Figura 5. Cambios en el nivel del mar a finales de la época del Pleistoceno, que empezó hace 2.5 millones de años y con éste, los periodos glaciares modernos. Al cambiar el nivel del mar, también cambia la posición de la haloclina y sobre ella se empiezan a formar y extender los sistemas de cuevas que hoy buceamos. Modificado de González-González et al (2008) y Blanchon & Shaw (1995).

3) Finalmente, el tercer paso asociado al proceso de carstificación es el responsable de la formación de estalactitas, estalagmitas, columnas y otros espeleotemas, por acumulación del material disuelto en el primer paso. En la formación de espeleotemas también está  involucrada la degasificación, es decir, la expulsión del CO2 del agua al entrar ésta en un ambiente de cueva diferente al del exterior desde el cual se filtró a través de la roca, lo que provoca la precipitación de carbonato de calcio (ver ecuaciones químicas). En el caso de las cuevas inundadas este proceso ya no sucede más. El grado de carstificación depende de factores que operan con diferente escala espacial y temporal, lo que permite una gran variedad de formas y decoraciones en el sistema de cuevas y cavernas.

Figura 6. Gota de agua con carbonato de calcio disuelto, suspendida del canal central de una estalactita. QRoo / Archivo personal. EMR (2015).

Teniendo en mente estos mecanismos, podemos decir que la formación de cenotes se genera a través de una secuencia de eventos: una cueva inundada puede formar un cenote tipo bóveda por hundimiento parcial del techo. Este proceso avanza desde arriba, por infiltración de la lluvia y desde abajo, por circulación subterránea. A continuación, la totalidad del techo se derrumba formando un cenote cilíndrico; si se interrumpe el flujo se forma por azolve y hundimiento de la zona adyacente un cenote de agua estancada, es decir, una aguada.

La disolución mayor ocurre en la zona de contacto y mezcla entre el agua dulce y salada, la zona de transición abrupta conocida como haloclina, la cual sube o baja dependiendo del nivel del mar, y por esta razón existen cuevas horizontales más profundas que otras (por ejemplo, en el sistema Dos Pisos). Al cambiar el nivel del mar, la haloclina se desplaza y empieza a disolver la roca a diferente profundidad, empezando así otro “nivel” de cuevas.

La haloclina estratifica el cenote: funciona como una barrera física que aísla la capa de agua dulce. En los cenotes costeros, la capa marina profunda no siempre se encuentra realmente estancada, sino que puede circular impulsada por las mareas y tormentas a través de túneles conectados con el mar (un caso muy claro es Tankah y la descarga del cenote Manatí en la orilla del mar). También observamos ojos de agua que descargan agua dulce e intercambian agua salada con el mar, en la laguna arrecifal de Puerto Morelos y en las playas al sur de Tulúm.

Figura 7. Diagrama de la Península de Yucatán, donde el agua subterránea está separada en dos capas de diferente salinidad y densidad: el lente de agua dulce y la intrusión salina -agua de mar- que se filtra a través de la roca. La zona de mezcla entre las dos capas se llama haloclina. La descarga de agua subterránea crea “ojos de agua” en la zona costera de la Península. EMR (2015).

Los cenotes son complejos sistemas acuáticos generados mediante la disolución de los carbonatos y otros minerales del suelo, por lo que en geología se llaman lagos de disolución, aunque en realidad algunos cenotes son más similares a ríos que a lagos, ya que cuentan con conexiones a corrientes subterráneas que favorecen la circulación de agua. A este tipo de sistemas acuáticos, en donde coexiste agua dulce y salada, se les denomina anquihalinos.

Los colapsos intermitentes a lo largo de los diferentes sistemas de cuevas de la Península van abriendo ventanas hacia la superficie, por donde podemos entrar a los conductos y pasajes. Generalmente los cenotes en la parte oriental de Quintana Roo, se forman por el colapso de cuevas de poca profundidad, extensas y ramificadas. A estos sistemas pertenecen Sac Actun (recientemente unida con Dos Ojos), Ox Bel Ha  y Ponderosa, entre muchos otros destinos populares de buceo de caverna y cueva. Otro tipo de cenotes, más comunes en el centro de la Península, por ejemplo alrededor del Anillo de Cenotes, son los llamados pit-cenotes (aunque existen algunos en Quintana Roo, por ejemplo, el Blue Abyss o El Pit, que sobrepasan los 120 metros de profundidad) en donde su formación seguramente incluye flujos de agua provenientes de regiones más profundas de la roca, donde la cavidad va creciendo desde abajo hacia arriba.

Cenotes_AGU_a

Figura 8. Comparación de distintos tipos cenotes con diferente mecanismo de formación. A la izquierda, pit-cenotes que predominan en el centro de la Península y sobre el anillo de cenotes. En ellos, seguramente intervienen flujos de agua desde profundidades mayores, favoreciendo la disolución de la roca desde abajo hacia arriba. Del lado derecho, morfología de los cenotes más comunes en la costa oriental de Quintana Roo, sobre la “Riviera Maya”. Estos cenotes son la entrada a sistemas de cuevas menos profundos y con galerías anchas y ramificadas. EMR (2015).

Para lograr un aprovechamiento sostenible de estos sistemas, es necesario un entendimiento integral de los cenotes, las cuevas, el movimiento del agua subterránea y su interacción con las rocas que forman el acuífero, la influencia del océano y sus mareas (es decir, el estudio del sistema hidrogeológico completo de la Península); también es necesario evaluar el impacto de las zonas urbanas y las posibles causas de contaminación de la única fuente de agua con la que contamos, que es precisamente el agua subterránea. Esta búsqueda debe darse por convergencia entre las ciencias ambientales, ciencias del agua, ciencias de la tierra, ciencias biológicas, el estudio y conservación de la red subterránea de conductos, trabajo con las comunidades, explotación eficiente de recursos y, por supuesto, la exploración y aprovechamiento sostenible mediante buceo de cuevas.

***


cave_yo_banner_sm800


Manera sugerida de citar este artículo:

Monroy-Ríos E (2016) ¿Cómo se formaron cuevas y cenotes? Espeleogénesis. Environmental Biogeochemistry – Blog personal. Publicado el 20 de mayo, 2016. Fecha de consulta: [dd/mm/aa].
http://sites.northwestern.edu/monroyrios/2016/05/20/espeleogenesis/


Referencias

Blanchon P & J Shaw (1995) Reef Drowning during the Last Deglaciation: Evidence for Catastrophic Sea-Level Rise and Ice-Sheet Collapse. Geology 23: 4-8.

González-González AH, C Rojas-Sandoval, A Terrazas, M Benavente, W Stinnesbeck, J Aviles, M de los Ríos & E Acevez (2008) The Arrival of Humans on the Yucatan Peninsula: Evidence from Submerged Caves in the State of Quintana Roo, Mexico. Current Research in the Pleistocene. Special Report. 25: 1-24.

NASA (2000) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colored elevation SRTM model of the Yucatan Peninsula.

QRSS (2016) Quintana Roo Speleological Survey. Actualizada el 19 Abril, 2016. Consultada el 15 mayo 2016.

Siddall M, J Chappell & EK Potter (2007) 7. Eustatic sea level during past interglacials. Developments in Quaternary Sciences 7: 75-92.


Cartografía de cuevas

Cartografía de cuevas secas
Es conocido que Quintana Roo México, posee varios de los sistemas de cuevas inundadas más grandes del mundo. Exploraciones recientes realizadas por equipos de buzos han puesto al descubierto cientos de kilómetros de conductos subterráneos. Sin embargo, nuestro estado también cuenta con un gran número de cuevas secas de considerable longitud. No podemos ignorar su existencia si deseamos convivir con ellas.

Chak Tun, Quintana Roo.

Adentrarse en una cueva es una experiencia inolvidable. Las cuevas nos hablan de geología, bioquímica, paleontología y arqueología. Las cuevas nos enseñan historia, nos motivan a conocerlas y a pensar en su futuro.

La cartografía se encarga de reunir y analizar datos y medidas de las diferentes regiones del planeta, para representarlas gráficamente con diferentes dimensiones lineales, a escala reducida. También se utiliza para nombrar a un conjunto de documentos territoriales, una colección de mapas.

El proceso en la elaboración de un mapa de cuevas comienza mucho antes de adentrarse en las entrañas del suelo. Cobran vital importancia la observación minuciosa y la dedicación para obtener datos precisos. Esto se logra mediante la medición de distancias, ángulos acimutales y verticales en estaciones dispuestas a lo largo de transectos en el interior de la cueva. Otra actividad importante consiste en realizar diagramas de las dimensiones indicando los tipos de decoración presentes a lo largo de sus pasillos y galerías. Esta información –que incluye datos, observaciones y diagramas– es capturada, analizada y utilizada en la construcción del mapa. Este mapa debe contener toda la información básica como el nombre, la fecha, las coordenadas de la entrada, la longitud máxima, la profundidad máxima, así como observaciones y características generales. El registro topográfico de cuevas inundadas se realiza de forma similar, aunque con algunas variantes, sobre todo por las restricción del tiempo de buceo que no permite registrar todos los detalles.

Pasos para construir un mapa topográfico detallado de una cueva, una vez que se han recolectado los datos de campo:

La cartografía de cuevas cobra particular relevancia en zonas como la Península de Yucatán, ya que nos permite ubicar perfectamente las entradas (accesos) de la cueva e identificar su recorrido por debajo del suelo. Por desconocimiento u omisión, se han desarrollado grandes complejos sobre galerías y pasillos subterráneos, en donde siempre está el peligro latente de hundimientos del terreno. De igual importancia, el contar con esta información nos permitiría emplearla como complemento o validación de información obtenida por medio de estudios más complejos, como por ejemplo los sondeos geofísicos.


El mapa que se muestra a continuación se realizó en equipo de tres personas con clinómetro (suunto) y cinta métrica.

Cueva Las Brujas. Sistema Chaak Tun. Quintana Roo, México.

Guía introductoria de Cartografía de cuevas
México Cave Survey

Ir a Galería de mapas 


Software

walls
Walls Cave Editor

Cavers
From left to right: (stand) Bob Osburn, Pat Kambesis, Mason Earles, Patricia Beddows, Karen Salinas and Emiliano; (knees) Aaron Addison, Mike Lace and Ed Mallon. Akumal, QRoo, 2008.

Ir a Galería de mapas 


Enlaces de interés:

Círculo Espeleológico del Mayab, AC.Proyecto Mexicano de Exploración en cuevasMexico Cave SurveyQuintana Roo Speleological SurveyNational Speleological Society


Emiliano Monroy-Ríos