PhD Candidate, Department of Economics



Cecilia PeluffoContact Information

Department of Economics
Northwestern University
2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208

 

 

Phone: 224-999-5682

mcpeluffo@u.northwestern.edu

 





Education

Ph.D., Economics, Northwestern University, 2017 (expected)
M.A.: Economics, Northwestern University, 2013
M.A.: Economics, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), Argentina, 2010
B.A.: Economics, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), Argentina, 2007

 

Primary Field of Specialization

Development Economics

Secondary Fields of Specialization

Labor Economics, Economics of the Family, Economics of Gender

Curriculum Vitae

Download Vita (PDF)

Job Market Paper

“Social Safety Nets for the Elderly and Women’s Empowerment”. (PDF)

Many middle-income countries are transitioning toward a demographic phase where traditional systems based on family care for the elderly tend to disintegrate. In this context, it is increasingly relevant to understand the potential effects of the extension in pension benefits to previously uncovered populations. Given that women are less likely to be covered by retirement benefits than men, the pattern toward universalization in the elderly pension coverage is likely to be gender biased. This paper provides evidence for the impact of the extension in pension benefits for the elderly on poverty, labor supply, transfers, health, and mortality in the context of the 2005 Argentinian Pension Reform, which disproportionately benefited women. Using the change in intra-household income distribution due to the reform as a source of exogenous variation in women’s bargaining power, I assess the impact of women’s empowerment on household consumption patterns for the elderly. I also study the validity of the efficiency hypothesis in consumption for this population. I find that access to pensions significantly reduced poverty, crowded out other sources of insurance, decreased labor supply, lead to improvements in health outcomes and reduced mortality among the elderly. Moreover, women’s empowerment is associated with greater expenditure shares on food and durable goods, reduced expenditure shares on housing, and higher female individual expenditures.

 

Other Research Papers and Work in Progress

Immigration Reform and Labor Market Outcomes.”. (PDF) [Abstract]

 

Weak Institutions as a Barrier to Economic Growth”, with Germán Bet, 2016. (Available upon request) [Abstract]

 

Assessing the Effects of Deforestation on Health”, in progress. [Abstract]

 

Early life exposure to macroeconomic shocks and human capital formation”, in progress. [Abstract]

 

Human capital transmission: the impacts of maternal education on child birth outcomes”, in progress. [Abstract]

 

References

Prof. Seema Jayachandran (Committee Chair)
Prof. Cynthia Kinnan
Prof. Matthias Doepke
Prof. Lori Beaman