Social Learning & Collaboration Tools

IMG_3751Last week, I attended the Association for Talent Development’s Annual International Conference & Expo in Denver, CO (#ATD2016).

One of the sessions, lead by Shannon Tipton of Learning Rebels, was focused on tools and resources to help support trainers and instruction designers to think beyond (or outside) of the classroom to enhance the level of learning within an organization. The session, called Tools for Your 21st Century Classroom, was a high energy, high value session filled with tools, resources and innovative ways to utilize them to elevate the learning beyond a traditional training course. You can find a version of the slides from this session on SlideShare.

I appreciated Shannon’s organization of the tools into three interconnected concepts based on functionality. She called them ‘three new drawers’ for your toolkit.

Learning ConnectivityfwThe three drawers are: Curate, Communicate, and Collaborate (the three Cs). The goal, as Shannon encouraged, was to hit a middle point where all three intersect. And ideally, move into a cycle where one supports the other.

Before I share my interpretation of the three concepts, it is important to get clear on your goals and objectives related to your learning program. You don’t want to just use a tool for the sake of using a tool, because it is cool or such. You need to be intentional about how the tool will connect to the learning and how it will help the learners do what they need to do.

When attempting to identify what social tools to use to support the development of stronger learning connections, Shannon recommends you ask yourself these questions:

  • How do I want this tool to help connect the learning?
  • What actions are critical to success? (be specific)
  • What do the learners need to do (curate, communicate, collaborate)?
  • What tools might help them get there?

CURATE:

This is about collecting, reading, evaluating, organizing and sharing content related to the learning topic to help people discover more. Two points that she made that I felt were fun and accentuated the importance of evaluating and sharing content:

  • Gathering & collecting information and not sharing is called hoarding.
  • Be sure to evaluate and ‘justify’ why the content is valuable before sharing. There is an abundance of information in the world, you are helping to weed out the crap and identify good and valuable content.

CURATION TOOLS*:

Pinterest-Logo

Pinterest

feed.ly

Feed.ly

Yootheme-Social-Bookmark-Social-delicious-box

Deli.icio.us

Clipboard

Flipboard

Diigo

Diigo

 

 

 

 

Curation in an ESN:
What might curation look like in an Enterprise Social Network? Tagging? A curated blog or discussion post? In what other ways could an ESN be leveraged to curate content? What does sharing look like in an ESN?

Two Examples:


COMMUNICATE:

This is about sharing your own insights and findings based on your learning and creating opportunities to have conversations with others about the content. You can write out your insights in a blog, draw/doodle out your ideas with images and visuals or you could even talk about your insights in a podcast. Communicating is also not about a one way street, it about connecting with others ideas and insights and creating a dialogue around the topic.

COMMUNICATION TOOLS: 

Sharing Insights: 

Wordpress

WordPress

LinkedIn Blog

LinkedIn Blog

Blogger

Blogger

Podcast

Podcast

YouTube

YouTube

 

 

 

 

Sharing Insight in an ESN:
ESN blogs or documents could serve as a tool. Sharing video in a post. What other ESN tools could be useful in sharing insights? 

Creating Conversation:

Yammer

Yammer

Slack

Slack

Twitter

Twitter

LinkedIn

LinkedIn

Google Hangouts

Google Hangouts

 

 

 

 

Creating Conversations in an ESN:
Discussions. Topic specific groups. Status updates. @Mentions. What other ESN tools can help to create conversations?


 

COLLABORATE:

Social collaboration, as Jane Hart explains, describes a “sub-set of social learning that is focused around the learning that takes place from working together, and where the emphasis is on achieving business objectives, and measuring its success in business or performance terms.” It is about working and planning together, it is about productivity through group sharing, it is about storing knowledge and information in an easily accessible form, and optimizing the knowledge of the community.

COLLABORATION TOOLS:

Google Drive

Google Drive

Dropbox

Dropbox

Share Point

Share Point

Evernote

Evernote

Pinterest

Pinterest

 

 

 

 

Collaboration in an ESN:
Document creation can serve as a collaboration tool. Discussion posts. What other resources in an ESN can help support collaboration?


*These are just a few of many possible tools. Some of the tools listed above were recommended during the session while others are my own contribution. I encourage you to share your favorite curation tools below. 

Additional Perspectives:

In addition to the Learning Rebels sessions, there were a handful of other sessions focused on leveraging technology to help support the social aspect of learning. As I looked up the #ATD2016 hashtag link, I saw this dialogue happening amongst some learning thought leaders including Jane Hart and Jane Bozarth offering additional ideas for how to organize and think about the tools. Here are the visuals they were sharing as a result of this tweet from [email protected].

Originally from Jane Hart (as she mentioned, from 2010)

CjTwLvUVAAEpqUe

Shared by Jane Bozarth

CjU3EE7WgAAm6xu

 

One Response

  1. Jeff Merrell says:

    I really do particularly like the tip on curation re: the curator being clear about why it is valuable. I picked up a routine on Twitter (from who knows who, but thank you, whoever you are) where you grab a snippet of content from the blog or article you are tweeting about, and use it in your retweet/tweet. So – don’t just retweet a link. Pick out something you find meaningful from the post. Hard to do in 140 characters, but it can be done. Every time I do that, I get more responses/likes than just a simple retweet. And often, it starts an interesting conversation with the blog/article author…

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