Syllabus

MONDAY
Aug 28

09:00 AM | Workshop, Personal & Project Introductions
An introduction to and outline of the workshop and introductions to workshop participants and staff. Please come ready to discuss your professional and scholarly background, current research and teaching interests, goals and hopes for the workshop, your proposed digital humanities project, and 2-3 digital projects you find interesting and/or inspirational.

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Seminar: Digital Humanities Readings
In this session, the workshop facilitators will lead a discussion of several readings and resources as an introduction to digital humanities theory, practice and critique, and that will help inform future workshop sessions.

Readings (required)

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Seminar: Overview of DH Methods, Modes & Tools
An introduction to various digital humanities methods, visualization and narrative modes, and digital research and publishing tools, with a special focus on the projects we are all working on during the workshop. Before this session, please explore either DiRT Directory or Alan Liu’s DH Toychest and identify a few modes, tools, and/or platforms potentially relevant to your project.

03:30 PM | Break

03:45 PM | Regroup, Report, Reflect
At the end of each day we will come together as a group to report and reflect on what we worked on and learned throughout the day. The final minutes will be dedicated to an overview of the next day of the workshop, introducing any homework, and placing our activities in context.

TUESDAY
Aug 29

09:00 AM | Morning Report
Each morning we will come together to briefly outline our goals for the day.

09:15 AM | Coffee & Collaborate
These sessions are dedicated for time working on your project. Activities could include working on course syllabus, learning a new platform or tool, prototyping narrative and designs, identifying resources, meeting with project team members, etc. Collaborative partnerships and teams are encouraged to form organically.

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Workshop: Data & Metadata
This session introduces basic data modeling and organization concepts. Building on three accessible metaphors—a curated collection of photographs, a personal library of books, and movies together with primary actors—we can begin to understand systems of consistently structuring data, motivations and methods for controlling the vocabulary used to describe persons and objects, and leading systems of defining relationships between objects. We will conclude by turning our data into a relational database that will power a website displaying our favorite books.

Readings

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Workshop: Network Analysis
This session introduces common approaches to network analysis for the purpose of understanding relationships between entities, be they various actors of various communities and groups, pieces of legislation, or world cities connected by air travel. We can build on a base understanding of data and metadata to collect and organize data that can be displayed as a series of points (nodes, vertices) and connecting lines (edges, vertices). In a broad sense, one can imagine network visualizations as a sort of map that is not (necessarily) bound by geography. By introducing computational algorithms, we can begin to gather insights from the complex mesh of interconnectedness: what does the algorithm perceive as a discrete cluster or group and why? What might the presence of certain clusters confirm or deny in terms of a scholarly hypothesis?

Readings

03:30 PM | Break

03:45 PM | Regroup, Report, Reflect

WEDNESDAY
Aug 30

09:00 AM | Morning Report

09:15 AM | Coffee & Collaborate

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Workshop: Maps & Mapping
Spatial analysis can be a powerful tool for understanding a range of human phenomenon both contemporarily and historically. In this session, we will begin by exploring the various mapping tools, resources, and support available to researchers at Northwestern. Kelsey Rydland, GIS Analyst at Northwestern University Libraries, will discuss best practices for getting your data organized and ready to map. Following a short presentation and discussion, participants will delve into hands-on exercises, working collaboratively to track and compile tabular data, creating a dynamic web map or exhibit using ArcGIS Online.

Readings

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Workshop: On Writing with Digital Media
Until recently, whether a student could express herself visually and sonically depended on her enrollment in a film production program, or an advanced art class. Yet over the past decade, with the rise of mobile devices, just about every university in America now offers courses across the humanities that endeavor to deepen students’ media literacy and competency, enabling them to engage in scholarly and literary pursuits not just on the page, but on the screen, using sound and image and whatever digital assets that tumble their way. With this cultural shift in mind, we will survey an ascendant media form called the video essay, and explore the many ways in which writing with image and sound differs from writing solely for the page. Our goal is to better understand how the act of writing is both furthered and complicated by visual and sonic elements. And we will experience some of these complications ourselves with a hands-on demonstration. —John Bresland, Lecturer in English and Director of the Weinberg College Media and Design Studio

Readings

03:30 PM | Break

03:45 PM | Regroup, Report, Reflect

THURSDAY
Aug 31

09:00 AM | Morning Report

09:15 AM | Presentation: Harris Feinsod & Open Door Archive
In this session, workshop alum Harris Feinsod, Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature, will discuss his digital humanities research and pedagogical project, Open Door Archive, a digital repository and exhibition space dedicated to the print culture and multimedia archives of multiethnic poetry in and beyond the US.

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Seminar: Digital Pedagogy and the Undergraduate Classroom
As humanities disciplines continue to embrace newer technologies for creative and scholarly forms, research and production engages with a growing number of media. At the same time, a generational shift has promised the notion of a digital native, while studies show that such “natives” can actually be, in fact, “naïves.” Thus, a recurring question centers around what types of literacies should be assumed, which should be taught, by whom, and when. In essence, what are the competencies students must possess to criticize and evaluate modern media? Do all students need to learn programming? Faculty teaching courses that include a digital component face many of these questions, particularly when considering a balance between time scheduled to cover subject matter versus digital tools and techniques.

Readings (required)

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Coffee & Collaborate

03:30 PM | Break

03:45 PM | Regroup, Report, Reflect

TUESDAY
Sep 5

09:00 AM | Presentation: Kelly Wisecup & Remapping Chicago
In this session, workshop alum Kelly Wisecup, Associate Professor of English, will discuss her digital humanities research and pedagogical project, Remapping Chicago: Louise Erdrich, Winona La Duke, and Great Lakes Native American Writers, an investigation into how Native American literature reimagines colonial mappings by examining representations of bodies, family relationships, land, politics, and so on. 

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Seminar: Access & Ethics in the Digital Humanities
In this critical and interactive session, Kelly Wisecup and Josh Honn will lead an exploration (through readings, works of art, digital projects, pedagogical examples, and more) of a wide range of issues related to digital technology and its application in the humanities and cultural heritage materials. More specifically, this session will cover practices and issues in digitization, copyright and fair use, open access publishing, native and indigenous cultural protocols, web accessibility, digital privacy and labor, and classroom and community practices.

Readings (required)

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Coffee & Collaborate

03:30 PM | Break

03:45 PM | Regroup, Report, Reflect

WEDNESDAY
Sep 6

09:00 AM | Morning Report

09:15 AM | Coffee & Collaborate

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Field Trip: Knight Lab
Joe Germuska and his team will welcome us to the Knight Lab, “a community of designers, developers, students, and educators working on experiments designed to push journalism into new spaces.” After an introduction and tour of the physical space, we will discuss the latest developments in “digital storytelling” and test out virtual reality!

Readings

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Coffee & Collaborate

03:30 PM | Break

03:45 PM | Regroup, Report, Reflect

THURSDAY
Sep 7

09:00 AM | Morning Report

09:15 AM | Coffee & Collaborate

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Seminar: Evaluating Digital Scholarship
As we develop new digital research and pedagogy projects, we need also to consider their evaluation, both the critique of web-based digital humanities projects and rubrics and metrics for evaluating student work in the digital humanities classroom. In this session, we will discuss readings (below) on evaluation digital scholarship, critique and evaluate existing digital humanities projects, and share our experiences evaluating print- and digital-based student assignments.

Readings (required)

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Coffee & Collaborate

03:30 PM | Break

03:45 PM | Regroup, Report, Reflect

FRIDAY
Sep 8

09:00 AM | Morning Report

09:15 AM | Coffee & Collaborate

10:30 AM | Break

11:00 AM | Keynote: Richard Jean So
In this presentation and discussion, Richard Jean So—Assistant Professor of English, McGill University and author of the book Transpacific Community: America, China, and the Rise and Fall of a Cultural Network—will explore a range of  pedagogical, technical, and ethical issues in digital humanities drawing from his own research and teaching on critical and computational approaches to race, culture, and power.

12:30 PM | Lunch

01:30 PM | Faculty Project Presentations
In this final session of the workshop, faculty participants will present an overview of their digital humanities projects to an audience of invited guests from across the Northwestern University campus. Following the presentations, we will open the floor to discussion of the faculty projects and the current state and future of digital humanities at NU.

03:30 PM | Closing Reception